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Home / Nutrition Advice / Behavioural Advice / Training & Behavioural Advice / Rehoming Dogs & Cats

 

Dog Rehoming - Behavioural Problems

 

If your dog is showing nervousness or aggression, or any other behaviour that is concerning you, seek help early. Ask your vet for a referral or visit www.coape.org for information on qualified behaviour specialists in your area.


TOP TIPS THAT GOOD TRAINERS KNOW


1 FORGET THE PAST - YOUR DOG HAS! LOOK TO THE FUTURE!
It's all too tempting to dwell on your dog's previous history. Maybe he had a bad start in life, was neglected or abandoned… but now he's found you! Start your dog's future from the moment he steps into your house. Establish a solid routine for him and treat him as if he was a puppy from a good breeder. Being treated normally is the best security you can give your dog!


2 START TRAINING NOW!
Don't wait before starting some gentle, basic training with your new dog. Good manners mean that he will be allowed much more freedom and will be able to accompany you out and about more than if he is unpredictable or unsociable. Tricks may seem like frivolous fun, but anything you teach your dog helps to build bonds between you and increases your overall control - as well as impressing your friends and family!


3 FAMILIARISE YOUR DOG WITH BEING HANDLED
All dogs need to learn to enjoy being handled and examined. This prevents the dog from experiencing stress at the vets and the groomers and is also a vital part of your daily care routine - enabling you to check his coat, skin, eyes, ears, mouth and feet and to keep him in tiptop condition. Using force is always counter productive in handling your dog. Instead, make handling pleasurable for your pet by giving lots of rewards for calm behaviour, and practise little and often.


4 REWARD BEHAVIOURS YOU LIKE, IGNORE THOSE YOU DON'T!
Dogs learn even when we are not training them! In only a few short days your new dog will already know what makes you laugh, what makes you cross and how to get you to give him attention when he feels like it! Be aware that your voice, eye contact and touch are all highly rewarding to your dog and that he probably thinks that shouting is a form of barking encouragement! If your dog repeats a behaviour which you do not like, have a think about how you might accidentally be rewarding him for it.


5 MAKE GROUND RULES AND STICK TO THEM!
Will you allow your dog on the sofa? What about upstairs or on the bed? Everybody has different rules for their dog, but it is unfair to change them from day to day or from person to person. Decide on your household 'rules' when your dog first arrives and then get everyone to stick to them. It will save a great deal of stress and confusion later on!

 

Finally, make sure you simply relax and get to know each other! Enjoying your dog's company and building a relationship with him or her is

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